Category Archives: Appetizers

Broccoli Slaw with Cashews and Cranberries

What amazing weather we’ve had here in Boston this week! Torrential downpour for three days last weekend, then summer-like sunny, clear days for the last three. Today–March 20, let me remind you–it reached 75. NUTS. Speaking of nuts, I bought some cashews yesterday and I’m super excited.

In the spirit of spring (I hear today is the first day?), I’ve been kicking into high-gear with my green-vegetable cooking. Last night I made Kale Chips for the first time and ate them so fast that I didn’t take pictures…so I’ll wait until my next post to share those :)

Today I made broccoli slaw to eat on my porch while sitting in the sun. Behold.

Broccoli Slaw with Cranberries and Cashews

I adapted Peanut Butter and Jargon’s recipe, which was adapted from The Kitchn’s. The modifications were largely out of convenience: I peeled my broccoli stalks and then chopped them roughly, since I just broke the food processor 2 weeks ago; I roasted/salted my raw cashew pieces while I was prepping everything, since I buy them raw; I accidentally used twice as many cashews as I was supposed to (from the original), and I only used half of the mayo/yogurt sauce since I don’t really need much at all (compared to original). NO MATTER: this was tasty. The recipe below reflects the amounts I actually used.

This would make a tasty side dish for some kind of chicken–I’m thinking grilled on a kebab. It also might work well for a picnic, though it would definitely need to be kept cool, since it has mayo in it (so maybe a backyard picnic instead of a hiking picnic). It’s a great example of experimenting with different combinations and just going with it. Just my kind of recipe these days….

Broccoli Slaw with Cashews and Cranberries
Makes about 6 cups

Adapted from Peanut Butter and Jargon’s recipe for Broccoli Slaw and The Kitchn’s recipe for Broccoli Slaw, which PB&J adapted from. To roast your own nuts, lightly coat in olive oil (I used 1 tsp for 1 cup cashew pieces), then salt, and put in a 350 F oven for about 10 minutes.

2 stalks of broccoli, stalks peeled, chopped roughly
1/2 cup red onion, chopped
1/2 dried cranberries
1 cup cashews, roasted and salted, chopped (use less if you’re not really into the nut thing)
3 Tbsp mayonnaise
3 Tbsp plain yogurt
1.5 Tbsp lemon juice
1/2 Tbsp sugar (omit if you prefer savory–I think I will next time)
1/2 tsp salt
1/8 tsp pepper
1/8 tsp ground mustard

In a large bowl, mix together the broccoli, onions, cranberries, and cashews. In a separate small bowl, whisk together mayonnaise, yogurt, lemon juice, sugar (if using), salt, pepper, and mustard. Pour the dressing over the broccoli mix and stir well. Let rest on the counter for 30 minutes or in the fridge for an hour before serving. I discovered 2 days later that this doesn’t keep particularly well–the nuts get soggy–so it’s best eaten the day it’s made. Enjoy!

Roasted Cannellini Beans with Rosemary

Roasted Cannelini Beans with Rosemary

Salty crunchy snacks that are NOT fried are notoriously hard to come by. These were easy to make and reallllly delicious, though they didn’t stay crunchy overnight. With a few minutes in the toaster oven I think they’d be crispy again, but I just ate them stale anyway because they were still that saltily wonderful.

These would probably be better with fresh rosemary, but it’s the dead of winter and I’m relying on dried everything. Definitely grind it up (or even really finely chop) first, since the dried stuff won’t stick to the beans and will poke your mouth when you try to eat these!

Roasted Cannelini Beans with Rosemary
Adapted from Ask Georgie’s Garlic and Rosemary Roasted Cannellini Beans

1 15-oz can cannellini beans, drained
2-3 tsp olive oil
1-2 tsp rosemary, ground
Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Rinse the beans twice and let them sit in a colander for 5-10 minutes. In a large bowl, toss together the beans and oil. Add the rosemary, salt, and pepper; toss to coat. Spread onto a cookie sheet in a single layer and roast for 25 minutes. Test one; if not crunchy enough, roast for another 5 minutes. Repeat as necessary. Be careful that they don’t burn.

Roasted Cannellini Beans with Rosemary

Secret Ingredient Pesto

Homemade secret-ingredient pesto

I love, love, love margherita pizza. Last week, I indulged myself on the way home from school and bought some basil (and roma tomatoes and whole milk mozzarella in ball form and whole wheat pizza dough) to make my favorite pizza…one day, I’ll remember to take pictures before I gobble it up. Luckily I had some leftover basil–a real treat in January in Boston–so I got to making a batch of pesto that only needed a bit of basil to make it work.

This pesto is not “real” pesto. It uses almonds instead of pine nuts and more spinach than basil. But since pine nuts and basil are such a luxury to come by, I think this is a perfect low-cost and high-deliciousness option! You could also use walnuts instead of almonds–I’ve seen that on other food blogs, though I’ve never tried it myself. If you don’t adore garlic, you might cut it down to 2 cloves.

I took Farm Girl Fare’s recommendation and tried this mixed with some rinsed garbanzo beans and chopped roma tomatoes, and OH MAN–it was divine and suprisingly filling! I’ve been using it this week for chicken sandwiches, too. So flexible and so flavorful.

Secret Ingredient Pesto
Adapted from Farm Girl Fare’s Recipe for Pesto.

1/4 cup toasted almonds
3 cloves garlic, peeled
Olive oil
3/4 cup frozen spinach, thawed
Bunch of basil (I had about 1 cup)
Salt and pepper to taste

In a food processor, combine the toasted almonds and the garlic and process until finely chopped. Add about 2 tsp olive oil, the spinach, and the basil, and process. Add olive oil as needed to get the paste-y texture–it will probably end up being about a tablespoon. Taste (with processor OFF, haha!) and add salt and pepper as needed.

Try not to eat it all straight off the spoon!

This was really hard not to eat off the spoon.

Roasted Stuffed Baby Portobello Mushrooms

I was hoping to post about my foray into ciabatta bread-making tonight. Unfortunately, my adventure turned into a dead end when the yeast just refused to cooperate after kneading the dough. I think I know what went wrong and hopefully soon I’ll be able to add to the chorus of praises for King Arthur Flour’s recipe for ciabatta.

It’s no great loss, though! Last night Mike threw together an impromptu dinner combining crap we had lying around in the fridge (well, not crap, but you know what I mean…) and some things we’d just picked up at the mecca of local grocery stores, Market Basket. Usually, Market Basket is nothing short of a madhouse on Sunday afternoons–no parking spots, packed aisles, many children and older people, and my favorite feature, sawdust on the floor. I think the snowstorm that lasted from Friday night until yesterday held some regulars back, though, because I wasn’t as exhausted after our trip as I normally am.

Working on the pork he’d picked out, Mike assigned me the stuffed portobello mushroom project.

Roasted Stuffed Portobello Mushrooms

(Side note: Writing “portobello” feels funny to me. I’ve always preferred “portabello.” And then there’s “portobella.” Apparently, they are all correct, but portobello is by far more common in a Google search, so…I’ll trust the wisdom of the crowds and go with that one. Sheesh.)

He grabbed a handful of baby spinach that was hanging out in the fridge, a few cloves of peeled garlic we buy in bulk, and sliced a piece of the Tuscan loaf we’d just bought. A piece of pecorino cheese from a few weeks ago was starting to get moldy, so we sliced off the edges and chopped it up. Mike also pulled out the block of cheddar we’d just thawed (apparently it can be frozen!).

I did the extra-tough task of throwing it all in the food processor and adding enough olive oil to get it to blend smoothly. I performed my salt-and-pepper-adding magic and DELICIOUS. Try not to eat it all before stuffing the mushrooms.

We bought baby portobello caps, so they only needed to be relieved of the woody interior (what’s left of the stem). When I used a spoon, I tore open a cap. Try using your finger instead…I had much better results. Practice makes perfect, I found, as I was much better at it by the last mushroom.

These took about 30 minutes overall, with about 15 minutes of that being oven time. They would be difficult to make in concert with another complicated dish, but I think if I had been cooking alone I would have managed to flip the meat when necessary so that everything finished at the same time. Luckily, with two cooks in the kitchen, it was a breeze.

Roasted Stuffed Baby Portobello Mushrooms
1 1-inch thick slice of crusty white bread, like a rustic loaf, sourdough, or baguette (use 2 slices for baguette)
Handful of fresh baby spinach (1/8-1/4 cup of frozen spinach, thawed and squeezed dry, might work)
4 cloves of garlic, peeled
2 oz. Pecorino, or any hard, waxy cheese (like Parmesan or Fontina), cut into pieces
2 oz. cheddar, cut into pieces
2-4 Tbsp olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste
6 baby portobello mushroom caps

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Tear the bread into smaller pieces and add to food processor. Pulse until broken up into coarse crumbs. Add spinach, garlic, cheeses, and about 2 Tbsp of olive oil in food processor and pulse to combine with bread. Add more olive oil if necessary for easier chopping. Add salt and pepper, pulse, taste, and repeat until it tastes excellent.

Remove woody center of each mushroom cap and discard. Gently but firmly spoon filling into each cap so that the mushroom is full but not overflowing. Once each is filled, distribute the rest of the stuffing so that there are small mounds (giving it that “stuffed” look). This way you won’t run out before actually filling each.

Place mushrooms, stuffing side up, on a baking sheet. Roast for 12-15 minutes, checking after 10 minutes for doneness. When ready, they will feel “spongy” if gently squeezed–similar to the texture of a hard-boiled egg (a bit softer).

Fall Overload! Butternut Squash-Apple Cider Soup

I feel like I start a lot of entries explaining that I’ve decided to make a dish because x ingredient was on sale this week at the grocery store. And you know what? I’m proud of that! Part of my goal in starting this blog was to give myself a reason to experiment and to learn to “cook by feel” instead of following recipes (or asking Mike).

Tonight’s dinner was a great example of having an idea and then adapting the ideas I found online to fit the ingredients in my pantry, inventing something completely my own in the process.

Based on a recipe for Roasted Butternut Squash Soup and one for Butternut Squash Green Apple Soup, I made up some shallot-butternut squash-apple cider-ginger soup. And oh man, I loved it. That’s saying something, because I don’t usually like soup!

**ALTHOUGH, I must include this aside. I was at River Gods in Central Square last week and I think it was the first time I’ve ever actually ordered a soup at a restaurant. Not counting clam chowder, of course. It was a white bean (cannelini, I think) creamy soup with brie and grapes. Oh my god. It was basically a dessert soup…but there was no. friggin. guilt. I definitely recommend trying it if you happen to be there anytime soon!

I actually had soup yesterday at school, too (garbanzo, kale, and ham), and it was pretty satisfying. I’m learning that a hot soup can be just the ticket when you need something light but warm and filling.

ANYWAY. Tonight’s soup reminded me of one Becca suggested for a dinner party we had last winter, although I think we had cream or yogurt then and it was pretty great. I need to find out from Becca if she still has that recipe…

If you don’t have shallots, any sweet onion will do (Vidalia, ideally). But look at how pretty the purple and green shallots are! And so delicate!

The flavors of this soup are pretty subtle, but the color is bold and refreshing and everything just feels wonderful while you’re eating it. Trust me. Try it. Do it. Maybe add some mint if you’re feeling adventurous (only a few sprigs, though).

Butternut Squash-Apple Cider Soup
Makes a lot of servings! Maybe 6-8 appetizer, 3-4 dinner

Olive oil
1 Tbsp butter
2 big shallots, sliced (or 1 Vidalia onion, diced)
1/2 cup apple cider
1 butternut squash, peeled, seeded, cut into 1-inch pieces
2 cups water
1 cup white wine (I used cooking wine, but regular would be better. You could also use chicken or vegetable broth for a different kind of soup)
2 tsp fresh ginger, minced
Salt
Pepper
Pinch nutmeg
Pinch cinnamon

In a large pot, heat oil and butter together, then add shallots and throw on a pinch of salt. Let them cook for a couple of minutes, then add apple cider and let it all reduce and pretend-caramelize for about 5 minutes. Add squash, water, wine, and ginger. Add salt, pepper, nutmeg, and cinnamon (be judicious with the last two). Bring to a boil, then simmer for at least 10 minutes, until squash is soft. Puree in a blender or with an immersion blender, sprinkle some pepper on top, and voila! Doneskies.

Note: If your squash isn’t soft after 10 minutes or so, you can cover the pot for a few minutes. It helped me a lot!

Cured “Salmon” (Steelhead Trout) on Cucumber Slices

If I could afford it, I would eat fish every day. I *love* fish. Especially with fluffy white rice and some nice soy or maggi sauce…yum yum yum. Unfortunately I live in the real world, so fresh fish is a treat.

Look at this beauty…it looked really amazing with the bright blue styrofoam, but unfortunately the camera didn’t really capture that pop!

For the party last weekend, I was planning to buy a bit of fresh salmon and cure it, then put slices on cucumbers. I did almost all of that, but instead of salmon, we found great looking steelhead trout for half the price. Steelhead is the same color as salmon and Mike attested to its very similar taste, so I went for it! And I felt like such a classy party hostess presenting these to my guests :)

Curing fish might seem a little, well, fishy, but it’s actually a great way to prepare fish without having to worry about it coming out perfectly fork-flaky and whatnot. It’s not “cooked,” but the fish isn’t exactly raw, either, since you’re basically salt-preserving it (killing any microbes). You make a brine, put it on the fish, wrap it in plastic wrap, and leave it in the fridge for a day. Wash, slice, serve, done.

You can really use any citrus for the zest, so if you just have lemons, zest from two of those is fine in place of the grapefruit. And “decoratively peeling” cucumbers is so simple: just run a veggie peeler in four columns so that peeled/unpeeled alternates, and they look beautiful sliced up.

Cured Trout/Salmon on Cucumber Slices
Makes 30 bite-size appetizers

1/2 cup salt
1/4 cup vodka (unflavored only!)
1 Tbsp sugar
Zest of 1 lemon
Zest of 1 grapefruit
1 pound trout or salmon, as fresh as possible, boned with skin on
3 cucumbers, peeled decoratively (see above) and sliced 1/4″-1/8″ thick
1/2 cup plain greek yogurt
1 Tbsp lemon juice
1 Tbsp dill

Mix together all ingredients in a small bowl. The texture will be like wet sand. Lay down three layers of plastic wrap on a clean surface, then place fish on it, skin side down. Spread cure mixture on top of fish, then wrap tightly with the plastic. Place on a cookie sheet and leave in the refrigerator for about one day. (It’s not really ideal to do much less or much more time. 18-36 hours is probably the widest possible range.)

Once fish has cured, remove from plastic wrap, wash off the cure with water, and slice into paper-thin pieces by cutting at an angle with the grain of the meat (see above). Place one or two pieces of fish on each cucumber slice. Mix together greek yogurt and lemon juice, then drop a small dollop on each cucumber/fish piece. Sprinkle with dill and serve.

Caramelized Onion and Goat Cheese Flatbreads

Birthdays in middle school were so much easier than they are now. I invited 10 or so girls to my house for pizza, cake, presents, a movie, a sleepover, and breakfast from my mom the next morning before everyone headed home. Now it seems so much more complicated! This year, I finally decided to have a party that would allow me to cook a bunch of delicious food I wouldn’t normally make and then…write about it!

I ordered Martha Stewart’s Entertaining last week. Opening it up made me feel like there were endless possibilities for cooking for my friends, and that suddenly I couldn’t have ENOUGH dinner parties. And so my ideas for the weekend’s food came in a flood.

I decided (after many iterations) on a relatively simple menu of 3 savory appetizers and 4 desserts, balanced to feed vegetarians and non-vegetarians, warm and cold, crunchy and soft, salty and sweet, traditional and non-traditional, picky and adventurous. I’ll be posting those recipes throughout the week.

The first is one of the simplest yet most delicious and impressive-looking. Courtesy of Mike, as always, come these Caramelized Onion and Goat Cheese Flatbreads. I was originally planning to make roasted tomato and goat cheese tarts on puff pastry, like O Pistachio’s Bite-Size Tomato Tarts, but flatbreads are a particular inside-joke with my friend Steph.

Steph’s from Portland, ME, and on a recent trip to the city for a frisbee tournament, she brought me and Mike to the Flatbread Company, a restaurant specializing in flatbreads. She told us it would be like nothing else we’d ever had before. It WAS delicious, but we teased her to no end for framing the flatbreads as the exotic cuisine of Portland. So now, at any opportunity, I like to make these “Portland specialties.” Somehow it never stops being hilarious!

We used pre-made pizza dough from the grocery store to save time, since we were making so many other dishes for the party. It’s so cheap, too–$2 for enough dough for 2 whole pizzas! My only complaint is that it’s difficult to find whole wheat pizza dough, and if I were to make my own I’d definitely make it with WW flour. We bought way too much dough, but extra flatbreads make great sandwiches the next day!

Caramelizing onions is a long process, usually about an hour or so, but it’s really easy if you’re patient, and so worth it. The pictures below show a couple of the steps to caramelization. They cook down to a soft, brown, super-savory treat that matches perfectly with the taste of goat cheese.

For this party, we made 4 flatbreads and cut each into eighths to serve 32 appetizers. You could also serve each flatbread as 1 dinner serving.

Caramelized Onion and Goat Cheese Flatbreads
Serves 4-32, depending on how you cut them!

Olive oil
3 large red onions, cut into spears (see photo)
Salt and pepper
1/2 bag pre-made pizza dough (usually 1 pound)
8 oz goat cheese, cold
Dried (or fresh) parsley

Heat about 1 Tbsp olive oil in your pan, enough to coat the bottom. Add onions and a few pinches of salt. Let the onions caramelize, stirring only occasionally, for about an hour, or until they’re brown and very soft.

To make flatbreads, divide pizza dough into quarters (you’ll get eighths from the whole bag, but we used only half for this particular appetizer). Stretch dough until it is evenly thin and about the size of your grill pan. Lightly brush oil onto the dough and place in a grill pan. Let cook for about 5 minutes, then flip and cook for another 5 minutes. Don’t move the dough once it’s in the pan or you won’t get the grill marks.

Once all of your flatbreads are finished, spread caramelized onions on each. Crumble about 2 oz of goat cheese on each flatbread, then sprinkle parsley over the top. Cut into appropriate portions and serve.

Grilled Asparagus with Lemonette Dressing and Marinated Tomatoes

Last weekend I was lucky enough to visit my good friends Becca and Kiki at their new (ADORABLE) apartment for a dinner party with some of their friends. Kiki made a fantastic ratatouille, though she forgot the tomatoes–so we thought maybe she could call it a “deconstruction,” a la Top-Chef-contestant-speak. A tomato-less ratatouille, perhaps?

Any opportunity to get together with these girls is special. We’re all super-busy and they’re both involved with theater in one way or another, so they’ve got wacky night schedules; combined with my homework and frisbee game schedules, it’s almost impossible to find a time with less than 4 weeks notice that we’ll all be able to make a date. So when I e-mailed earlier this week about having dinner tonight and they both could make it, I was thrilled, to say the least!

Of course I enlisted Mike’s help developing the menu. Kiki is a vegetarian, and Becca claims to only eat things encrusted with diamonds, so it’s a difficult crowd. We ended up with three Italian-inspired courses: a grilled asparagus with lemonette and tomato dressing; panko-crusted eggplant medallions with zucchini-squash marinara, and banana scallops with caramel-praline ice cream and grated chocolate.

(I just noticed all the hyphenated titles in that menu and you know what? I feel like a real cook for it.)

All in all, it was utterly fantastic. I’m a little short on photos because I was so distracted by the joy of prepping this meal (slash, I was really pressed for time because I had planned on 4 hours to leisurely prep then realized I had a meeting right in the middle and thus only had 2).

I’ll post the rest of this menu in the next few days, but for now, here’s Mike’s recipe for the appetizer. I made the dressing and tomato marinade, plus blanched the asparagus, all about 8 hours before serving, and I think you could get by on up to 24 hours of storing in the fridge. It’s a great way to kick off a small party with friends, but it also works well if you have a few minutes to refrigerate everything so the flavors meld well.

Grilled Asparagus with Lemonette Dressing and Marinated Tomatoes
Serves 2-3 as appetizer

1 bunch asparagus (approx. 1 lb)
1 large tomato, preferably golden, 1/2-inch dice
3-4 Tbsp olive oil, divided
2-3 cloves of garlic, grated fine
Salt and pepper, to taste
Juice of one lemon

In a small bowl, whisk together about 1 Tbsp olive oil, grated garlic, and salt and pepper to taste. Add diced tomatoes, lightly toss, and refrigerate for at least a half hour.

In a blender, combine equal parts lemon juice and olive oil (probably about 2 Tbsp each) with salt and pepper. Pulse for a few seconds and then slowly drizzle in more oil until mixture emulsifies. You’ll notice it changes color and consistency; that’s when it’s done. This should take another tablespoon or so of olive oil. Refrigerate this mixture for at least a half hour; whisk with a fork when you take it out to use it.

For the asparagus: Set a large pot of water on the stove to boil. Set up a large bowl filled with ice water nearby, probably in the sink. When you’re preparing asparagus, you need to take off the tough bottoms. The easiest and most effective way is to simply snap the end off–the point where it naturally breaks is the point between the good part and the tough part. After removing the ends from all of your asparagus, cut them all in half so you have approximately 3-inch pieces. When water is boiling, quickly add all of the asparagus and cook for about 2 minutes. VERY QUICKLY remove the asparagus from the boiling water and plunge into cold water (I used a pasta spatula for this) to stop the cooking process–this is blanching it! After asparagus is cool to the touch (about 5 minutes), drain and refrigerate for as long as you need to (up to 24 hours).

When you’re about ready to serve, grill the asparagus for about 1 1/2 minutes per side in a cast iron grill pan. Immediately after plating the asparagus, spoon approximately 1 Tbsp of lemonette on top of each serving, then about 2 Tbsp tomato mixture. Serve while asparagus is still warm.

I *love* my cast-iron grill pan so much–it’s one of our most-used kitchen tools. I HIGHLY recommend the $20 investment!

Yum yum yum. You could probably double the asparagus and serve 4-6 with this recipe–we had leftover tomatoes and lemonette after plating everything.

Salmon, Avocado, and Grapefruit Verrines (Savory Parfaits)

I can see how canned fish gets a bad rap. Tuna straight from the can just doesn’t do it for me–and until recently I thought the only cure was adding mayo, salt, and pepper. Canned mackerel tends to hang out on our shelves for a while, and I’ve never even seen an open can of sardines.

Enter canned salmon. I started eating it about two weeks ago after I learned a few things: it’s wild-caught, which is better for us and better for the environment. It’s also cheap, for salmon, and delicious! (I could go on about the nutritional benefits, too.)

Your first foray into eating canned salmon definitely takes some courage. The skin and bones are usually in the can, so the squeamish may struggle. It turns out that the canning process softens the bones enough that they’re safe to eat straight out of the can, and they offer a great source of calcium. Just close your eyes, pretend they aren’t there and stir up as usual. Eventually you’ll feel like a pro when you toss the spines in without a thought.

This recipe is adapted from one I found in the Boston Globe’s online archives. A “verrine” is essentially a layered sweet or savory dish in a small glass, sort of like a parfait. Apparently I am waay behind the verrine trend–but I’m pretty sure I’m about to start this trend in my own kitchen!

The original recipe is for Crab and Avocado Verrines, but I wanted to incorporate canned salmon. I also went a little heavier on the flavor components–the lime juice, the salt, the pepper.

I find if you add your spices in layers and taste as you go, you’ll always use more than a typical recipe calls for. Thanks go to my roommate/former professional cook/resident Southerner/best friend Mike (who should be introduced by now), who taught me that food is actually…wait for it…supposed to taste GREAT, ALL the time! I used to think the things I made were bland because I made them at home, but it turns out I just needed more salt and pepper. Get brave with those pinching fingers!



See the picture of the avocado above? That’s what it should look like when you dice it–just cut carefully while holding the avocado half in one hand, then use a spoon to scoop the pieces into the bowl and voila! Easiest method ever.

Finally, the original recipe used these ingredient amounts to make four appetizers. I used larger glasses than technical “verrines” (usually small juice glasses), so I only made two servings and ate them as smallish meals.

Salmon, Avocado, and Grapefruit Verrines
Adapted from Beatrice Peltre’s Crab and Avocado Verrine

*I also just discovered via Google that Beatrice is also La Tartine Gourmand. Her blog is full of beautiful photos and fantastic recipes (including a different verrine from two weeks ago). Check it out!

1 grapefruit
1 medium avocado
2 scallions, chopped (reserve 1 Tbsp white ends)
Grated rind, fresh juice of 1 lime
Salt and pepper, to taste
3 Tbsp olive oil
7 oz. canned salmon (half of a standard can)
1 Tbsp grated fresh ginger
1 Tbsp chopped fresh cilantro, plus some for garnish

1. Supreme the grapefruit. [These are good directions if you've never done it before: How to Supreme (Segment) an Orange.]

2. Split the avocado in half and remove the pit. Dice the flesh and drop into a medium-sized bowl. Add the scallions, lime rind, 2 Tbsp of the olive oil, and salt and pepper. Lightly toss. Be sure to taste while adding your salt and pepper.

3. In another medium-sized bowl, combine the salmon, lime juice, ginger, chopped cilantro, the white ends of the scallions, 1 Tbsp of olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste.

4. Use half of the salmon mix to fill the bottom layer of the glasses (so you should have half left after making this layer). Repeat with the avocado mix, then the rest of the salmon, and finally the rest of the avocado. Top with slices of grapefruit and garnish with cilantro. You can eat immediately, but it’s best refrigerated for at least an hour.